Tag Archives: Valle de Bove

Descending into the Valle del Bove

‘Hmmm….’ the Parco Del Etna guide looked us up and down, ‘…………..they are walking shoes, not boots and have you got anything warmer it can get cold up there’. My partner and I looked at each other and promptly decided we would be fine as we had used the same shoes in Iceland where there are far more volcanoes, we had warm clothes in our backpacks (which in the end we didn’t need anyway) and that the guide had just felt the need to say something as tends to be the case here in Sicily. Someone is always there with some unwanted advice and this was no different. This was confirmed when others joined us and the guide said nothing about their ‘inappropriate footwear’.

Every now and again, the Parco Dell Etna organise walking tours at the weekend. You pay a very small and reasonable fee and you get to discover new walks on Etna whilst learning titbits of information along the way. Finding out about these walks is down to luck as they are not advertised very well and you therefore often come across them by chance, as I did. This one particulary intrigued me as it was a walk into the Valle de Bove or Valley of the Bulls. I have stood at various points and looked down into the Valle del Bove but never have I actually ventured into it, mainly because I had no idea how to get there.

The Valle del Bove is a massive, wide valley that was thought to be created from a collapsed crater. It hugely important as the majority of lava flows from eruptions end up here and the basin is so large that it is able to take all this lava thereby protecting the towns on the lower slopes of Etna – most of the time anyway. When you see it you can’t quite take in how big it is but what you definitely notice is that it is one vast, black expanse of lava. For more information on its formation, click here, it is quite an interesting read!Above the clouds

The weather was perfect on the morning of the walk. Clear blue skies gave us the best view of Etna that we have ever had as we made our way up the winding roads to Rifugio Sapienza. A group of about 20 of us took the cable cars up to a height of 2,500 m. The view of distant mountain peaks and the occasional lake was  quite a breathtaking sight. We walked uphill for a short distance before veering away from the main craters and walking to a ridge which overlooked the Valle del Bove. Here, the panorama was something else. Yes, we could see the mainland of Italy to our left but on our right we were also able to make out the Scogliera at Aci Trezza. As we marvelled at the view a cloud of ash blew out of one of the craters behind us.Black & Red

As we stood on the ridge, I kept looking at the angle of the slope we were about to go down. A steep slope which consisted of volcanic sand. As we started to descend my legs felt a bit wobbly and I nearly lost my bottle but I soon learnt to lean back slightly to steady myself and before I knew it I was taking bigger and more confident steps. The sand was so soft that it went up to almost knee height. Little by little people grew in confidence and soon one or two of them went flying past me. It didn’t matter that we were only wearing walking shoes and  not boots as everyone had to stop now and then to empty the sand from their shoes. The changing landscape and views as we made out way down continued to impress as we snapped away with our cameras and phones. Several stops to empty shoes (and boots, I gleefully add) later we arrived at the bottom of the valley where we pearched on some lava rocks and ate something, lamented how we should have brought some wine with us and emptied our shoes again.Angles It's all downhill from here The long way down

The next part of the walk was equally as fascinating as we meandered through the valley past different lava formations, jumping over large cracks and finding a new route around a large rockfall.Cracked open

After a brief respite we started the climb out of the valley. We had to climb over a few trees which had fallen across the path and the climb was steep. Most of us stopped to take photos of a particulary poisonous mushroom which glowed bright red against the black earth. For me, it was a great excuse to catch my ever dwindling breath. Once we got to the top, we were again met by beautiful views of one of the craters and the Valle de Bove. I managed to appreciate it despite my now wobbling legs.

We then completed our walk passing through a familiar trail and all feeling tired but satisfied with the day’s walk. The only downside was the large amount of litter we encountered at the car park. All those ignorant people who picnic there and dump their rubbish should be hanging their heads in the shame as they are destroying the very nature that the flock to visit.

One fox, some chicken and a grumbling volcano

About one week after Etna’s last eruption we decided to hike up Mount Zoccolaro to get a good view of the Valle del Bove into which the lava rivers were flowing. This was our third attempt at the trail. The first time, we had had to turn around near to the top as it was lunchtime and you don’t keep the ‘in-laws’ waiting. The second time, we were both recovering from the flu and had tried to hike too soon.

It is not that the trail is particularly long, it is only about 1.5km. It is more a case of it all being uphill and quite steep at times. It is a beautiful walk and fortunately there is lots of shade at the start which was definitely needed this time round. It starts off along an apple orchard before entering into a wooded area of beech trees. There are two noticeably large trees which countless people have carved their names into. The trail can be slippery at times especially if there is a fresh covering of ash from an eruption and you do have to watch out for tree roots. As it was summer there was quite a lot of undergrowth that was quite tall in places and there were plenty of wildflowers to see along the way.

There are plenty of viewpoints along the way to spur you on and to give you an excuse for a pit-stop. On the last part of the trail we had to scramble up a bit of rock as the path wasn’t very clear but this time we got to the top and the view was breathtaking.Etna Panorama fm Mt Zoccolaro_edited-1

We could make out the lava flows from the recent eruption and we could see the whole of the Valle del Bove, a black, lava strewn expanse (in fact, it is 37sq km). Just as my partner was saying that Etna had gone quite again she started grumbling rather loudly and I felt a little bit too close to danger.  She continued to grumble the whole time we were up there and from time to time we could see plumes of smoke being blown out of the New South East Crater. I am not sure how long they will call it the New South East Crater. It was formed a few years ago when does it lose its ‘new’ status?

When you look down into the Valle de Bove you see so many different shapes and cracks made by different lava flows. Nothing seems to be growing there and it is difficult to gauge the size of the cracks that you see. I have looked down into the Valle de Bove from above but this view far outstrips that one and  really enforces the magnificence of Etna. After looking at the view for ages and nervously jumping every time we heard a boom from the grumpy one we took advantage of a nearby platform and sat and had a picnic of chicken and chips which we had picked up in nearby Zafferana Etnea. Although I didn’t really eat much despite being rather famished, probably because I kept looking in awe around me.

It would seem that we weren’t the only hungry ones on the mountain. Not long after we had finished our picnic, I saw a fox appear from the bushes. It ignored us at first. It had spotted something living in a hole nearby and it set about furiously digging until it had managed to get the small reptile. It then noticed us, or at least smelt our chicken, and started to come closer. Not sure why but I didn’t feel comfortable with this, foxes  can look quite menacing and I am not used to one coming so close, so fearless. Therefore, we took our smelly chicken and headed off back down the mountain.  On our way we met a German family who we warned about the fox as they had young children who were looking rather hot and bothered. It turns out that was one of the reasons they had taken the trail. It appears that they had been told of a ‘friendly’ fox who lived on the trail by the owner of their B&B. The fact that the fox was up there spurred them on.

It is not the first wild animal that we have seen on that trail. Previously we had encountered a mountain cat which had quietly but calmly walked right past us. Not sure if the cat would ever attack the fox or vice versa if hungry, would definitely be concerned for any cubs.  Mountain cat on Etna

The way back down is harsh on the knees but it is definitely a walk that I will do again, especially next time Etna erupts!